Memory in the religious education classroom (Part 1: Historical perspectives, constructivism and foundational content)

Michael Chambers, Australian Catholic University

Abstract

This paper is about memory, its place in the religious education classroom and the way it might inform the practice of religious education. The paper is in two parts. Part 2 will be published in a later issue of this journal in 2010.

In Part 1, the argument is put forward that memory and rote learning are under-utilised in the religious education classroom. Further, Part 1 appeals for a balance between constructivist educational models and models of teaching that incorporate memory and rote learning so that student knowledge of foundational content is enhanced. Part 2 will offer a perspective that the arts, namely music performance, may be a source of inspiration to religious educators for embracing memory.