Publication Date

2017

Abstract

Objectives Evidence regarding the efficacy and dosing of vitamin D on fall and fracture prevention, with or without calcium, is characterised by uncertainty. Methods A panel of experts was organised at the First Australasian Conference on Sarcopenia and Frailty in Melbourne, Australia, in November 2016 to provide an interpretation of the current evidence and to give their opinions regarding the supplementation of vitamin D in three hypothetical cases. Results and Conclusion The authors conclude that (i) target serum 25(OH)D concentration should be 50 to 60 nmol/L year round, with a conservative upper limit < 100 nmol/L; (ii) change in serum concentrations at any given dose is highly variable among individuals; (iii) dosing interval may need to be < 2 months to have a continuous benefit; (iv) a loading dose can raise levels to target quickly, but there is no evidence yet that this has any positive effect on falls or fracture outcomes; and (v) a maintenance dose of 1000 IU/day, or given as an equivalent dose weekly or monthly, is sufficient for most individuals.

School/Institute

Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Document Type

Journal Article

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