Publication Date

2019

Abstract

Adolescent active travel (AT) can contribute to health-enhancing physical activity, sense of community, social interactions, spatial and navigational skills and is a sustainable form of transport. Data analysed were from surveys with validated scales, translated and adapted for Chinese speaking Hong Kong adolescents and their parents, and administered to 1299 adolescent/parent dyads. Using hierarchical modelling, this study examined independent associations of socio-demographic, perceived environmental, social and psychological factors (in that order) with adolescent AT to/from school (ATS) and AT to other destinations in Hong Kong. Moderation by gender and age on perceived environmental and social factors and number of household vehicles on proximity to destinations with AT were also estimated. The adolescents participating in ATS (58%), averaged 7.93 trips and 139.79 min per week. Adolescents averaged 7.68 trips/week to destinations other than school. Perceived proximity of school to home and social support for PA from peers were independently associated with higher odds of engaging in ATS. Social support for PA from household adults was associated with lower odds of engaging in ATS, especially in older adolescents. Trip frequency in those who engaged in ATS was positively associated with perceived proximity of school, access to services and parental transport-related PA. Perceived proximity of school was negatively associated with weekly minutes of ATS. Gender modified the association between social support for PA from peers and ATS frequency, and that of perceived proximity to public transport from home with weekly minutes of ATS. Perceived environmental, social and psychological factors were independently associated with AT to destinations other than school. In conclusion, Hong Kong adolescents appear to have high frequencies of ATS and AT to other destinations than reported elsewhere. Social support from peers, parental AT and having schools and other destinations within walking distance from home may independently contribute to adolescents’ AT.

School/Institute

Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Document Type

Journal Article

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