Publication Date

2008

Abstract

This chapter describes the current state of the Information Systems (IS) discipline within the state of Victoria, Australia. It reports on the ways in which Victorian universities are addressing the challenges associated with reducing local and international student demand, and hence enrolments, at a time when IS in particular and information and communications technology (ICT) in general are seen by the business sector as necessary components contributing to organisational success. Transcripts of interviews with 14 academics at nine universities throughout Victoria are analysed to give a current profile of IS programs and identify the trends in their development over time. First, a profile of the state of Victoria, its education system and its ICT industry is provided to place this work in context. Next, the interview sample is described and a number of relevant topics of interest are identified and discussed, comparing and contrasting the various programs. Third, a summary of the findings is provided in light of the framework used to guide the larger study of the Australian IS programs, which includes an assessment of the impact of mechanisms of control and the core body of knowledge on research and teaching methods and standards, key research and teaching IS topics and laws, and rules and guidelines used within the IS programs. Finally, the relationship between the impact of local contingencies and the degree of professionalism is examined.

Document Type

Open Access Book Chapter

Access Rights

Open Access

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