Publication Date

2017

Abstract

Mental illness increases a person’s risk of physical health issues, including cardiovascular disease, leading to premature morbidity and mortality. Screening for cardiovascular disease through metabolic monitoring is recommended to aid in early detection. The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether consumers admitted to an inpatient mental health unit receive routine metabolic monitoring, and to explore the contribution of a nurse practitioner to metabolic monitoring and the actioning of abnormal results. The present study used a retrospective mirror image cohort method to look at clinical consumer files for two separate 6-month periods before and after a nurse practitioner role commenced. Metabolic monitoring variables were computed as completion frequencies and percentages. Univariate analyses were computed to describe differences among metabolic monitoring variables. A total of 497 consumers were admitted to the mental health inpatient unit’s intensive care area across the two 6-month data-collection periods. Prior to the nurse practitioner role, only 2% of consumers had their body mass index (BMI) risk calculated; less than 1% had their waist circumference measured, and no abnormal results were referred to a general practitioner (GP). After the nurse practitioner role commenced, BMI risk was calculated for 67% of consumers, waist circumference recorded for 68%, and referrals for abnormal results were forwarded to 37 consumers’ GPs. A nurse practitioner on the inpatient mental health unit has allowed for a considerable increase in the metabolic screening of admitted consumers resulting in a number of referrals being forwarded to consumers’ GPs to be acted upon.

School/Institute

School of Nursing, Midwifery & Paramedicine

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

Access may be restricted.

Share

COinS