Publication Date

2016

Abstract

This study examined the link between physical symptoms, affect, and self-esteem in everyday life across adulthood. The sample consisted of young, middle-aged, and older adults. Results indicated a significant Self-Esteem × Physical Symptoms interaction on positive affect (PA). The effect of self-esteem on PA was lower with increasing physical symptoms. For negative affect (NA), the Self-Esteem × Physical Symptoms × Age interaction was significant. In older adults, the effect of self-esteem on NA was lower with increasing physical symptoms. Thus, the effect of self-esteem ran opposite to the expected buffering effect. In addition, the age difference in the effect of self-esteem on NA presents potential challenges to the adaptive capacity of older adults in emotional well-being.

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

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