Publication Date

2014

Abstract

Objective. To assess the population burden of angina pectoris symptoms (APS), self-reported angina and a combination of these, and explore potential ethnic disparity in their patterns. If differences in APS were found between Sami and non-Sami populations, we aimed at evaluating the role of established cardiovascular risk factors as mediating factors. Design. Cross-sectional population-based study. Methods. A health survey was conducted in 2003 2004 in areas with Sami and non-Sami populations (SAMINOR). The response rate was 60.9%. The total number for the subsequent analysis was 15,206 men and women aged 36 79 years (born 1925 1968). Information concerning lifestyle was collected by 2 selfadministrated questionnaires, and clinical examinations provided data on waist circumference, blood pressure and lipid levels. Results. This study revealed an excess of APS, self-reported angina and a combination of these in Sami relative to non-Sami women and men. After controlling for age, the odds ratio (OR) for APS was 1.42 (pB0.001) in Sami women and 1.62 (pB0.001) for men. When including relevant biomarkers and conventional risk factors, little change was observed.When also controlling for moderate alcohol consumption and leisure-time physical activity, the OR in women was reduced to 1.24 (p 0.06). Little change was observed in men. Conclusion. This study revealed an excess of APS, self-reported angina and a combination of these in Sami women and men relative to non-Sami women and men. Established risk factors explained little or none of the ethnic variation in APS. In women, however, less moderate alcohol consumption and leisure-time physical activity in Sami may explain the entire ethnic difference.

School/Institute

Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Document Type

Open Access Journal Article

Access Rights

Open Access

Notes

© 2014 Bent-Martin Eliassen et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.

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