Publication Date

2015

Abstract

Background: Recent evidence links sedentary behaviour ( or too much sitting ) with poorer health outcomes; many adults accumulate the majority of their daily sitting time through occupational sitting and TV viewing. To further the development and targeting of evidence-based strategies there is a need for identification of the factors associated with higher levels of these behaviours. This study examined socio-demographic and health-related correlates of occupational sitting and of combined high levels of occupational sitting/TV viewing time amongst working adults. Methods: Participants were attendees of the third wave ( 2011/12 ) of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle ( AusDiab ) study who worked full-time ( ≥35 h/week; n = 1,235; 38 % women; mean ± SD age 53 ± 7 years ). Logistic and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted ( separately for women and men ) to assess cross-sectional associations of self-reported occupational sitting time ( categorised as high/low based on the median ) and also the combination of occupational sitting time/TV viewing time ( high/low for each outcome ), with a number of potential socio-demographic and health-related correlates. Results: Higher levels of occupational sitting ( > 6 h/day ) were associated with higher household income for both genders. Lower levels of occupational sitting were associated with being older ( women only ); and, for men only, having a blue collar occupation, having a technical/vocational educational attainment, and undertaking more leisure-time physical activity ( LTPA ). Attributes associated with high levels of both occupational sitting and TV viewing time included white collar occupation ( men only ), lower levels of LTPA ( both genders ), higher BMI ( men ), and higher energy consumption ( women ). Conclusions: Higher household income ( both genders ) and professional/managerial occupations ( men only ) were correlates of high occupational sitting time, relative to low occupational sitting time, while health-related factors ( lower LTPA, higher BMI – men, and higher energy consumption – women ) were associated with high levels of both occupational sitting and TV viewing time, relative to low occupational sitting and low TV viewing time. These findings suggest possible high-risk groups that may benefit from targeted interventions. Further research is needed on potentially modifiable environmental and social correlates of occupational sitting time, in order to inform workplace initiatives.

School/Institute

Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Document Type

Open Access Journal Article

Access Rights

Open Access

Notes

© 2015 Hadgraft et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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