Publication Date

2012

Abstract

Summary In elderly man, low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was associated with a substantial excess risk of death compared to 25(OH)D values greater than 50–70 nmol/l, but the association attenuated with time. Introduction The aim of the present study was to determine whether poor vitamin D status was associated with an increase in the risk of death in elderly men. Methods We studied the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and the risk of death in 2,878 elderly men drawn from the population and recruited to the MrOS study in Sweden. Baseline data included general health and lifestyle measures and serum 25(OH)D measured by competitive RIA. Men were followed for up to 8.2 years (average 6.0 years). Results Mortality adjusted for comorbidities decreased by 5% for each SD increase in 25(OH)D overall (gradient of risk 1.05; 95% confidence interval 0.96–1.14). The predictive value of 25(OH)D for death was greatest below a threshold value of 50–70 nmol/l, was greatest at approximately 3 years after baseline and thereafter decreased with time. Conclusions Low serum 25(OH)D is associated with a substantial excess risk of death compared to 25(OH)D values greater than 50–70 nmol/l, but the association attenuates with time. These findings, if causally related, have important implications for intervention in elderly men.

School/Institute

Institute for Health and Ageing

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

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