Publication Date

2014

Abstract

Summary Serum adiponectin is a risk factor for fracture. The predictive value attenuates with time in elderly men so that its use for the risk assessment in the long term is questionable. The study underlines the importance of testing the long-term stability of potential risk factors. Introduction High serum adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of fracture in elderly men. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of adiponectin on the probability of fracture as a function of time. Methods The probability of osteoporotic fracture was computed in 989 elderly men from the MrOS study in Sweden. Baseline data included clinical risk factors for fracture, femoral neck BMD and serum adiponectin. Men were followed for up to 7.4 years with a mean follow up of 5.3 years (range 0.0–7.4 years). Poisson regression was used to model the hazard function for osteoporotic fracture and death to determine the 10 year probability of fracture. Results During follow up, 124 men sustained one or more osteoporotic fracture. There was a significant interaction between adiponectin and time since baseline (p = 0.026) such that the longer time since baseline, the lower the gradient of fracture risk. When using this interaction in the calculation of 10-year probability of fracture, the probabilities of osteoporotic fracture varied little over the range of adiponectin values. Conclusion Serum adiponectin is a risk factor for fracture. Nevertheless, the predictive value attenuates with time so that its use for the risk assessment in the long term is questionable. This study underlines the importance of testing the long-term stability of potential risk factors that might be used in fracture risk assessment.

School/Institute

Institute for Health and Ageing

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

Access may be restricted.

Share

COinS