Publication Date

2017

Abstract

The objective was to examine one family’s experience with the parenting intervention Baby Triple P for parents of a very preterm infant. The family was in the intervention group of a large randomized controlled trial. At baseline, 6-weeks corrected-age and 12-months corrected-age, both parents were assessed for depression as measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and subjective stress as measured by the Impact of Event Scale. At 6-weeks corrected-age and 12-months corrected-age, the mother was assessed for maternal self-efficacy as measured by the Maternal Self-Efficacy Scale, attachment as measured by the Maternal Postnatal Attachment Scale, responsiveness as measured by the Maternal Infant Responsiveness Instrument, and the quality of the mother-infant relationship as measured by the Emotional Availability Scales. Results at baseline showed the mother was at risk for depression and was experiencing a moderate level of subjective stress, while the father was experiencing a mild level of subjective stress. After the Baby Triple P intervention, the mother’s Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Impact of Event Scale scores and the father’s Impact of Event Scale score had dropped to within the normal range at 6-weeks corrected-age, and were maintained at 12-months corrected-age. The mother also indicated she experienced greater levels of self-efficacy, attachment, responsiveness, and the quality of the relationship with her infant. Both parents rated that they were very satisfied with the Baby Triple P program on the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. This study indicated that the Baby Triple P intervention may be beneficial for some families with a very preterm infant.

Document Type

Journal Article

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