Publication Date

2014

Abstract

Aim: Our understanding of heart failure in younger patients is limited. The Meta-analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) database, which consisted of 24 prospective observational studies and 7 randomized trials, was used to investigate the clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of younger patients. Methods and Results: Patients were stratified into six age categories: < 40 (n = 876), 40–49 (n = 2638), 50–59 (n = 6894), 60–69 (n = 12 071), 70–79 (n = 13 368), and ≥80 years (n = 6079). Of 41 926 patients, 2.1, 8.4, and 24.8% were younger than 40, 50, and 60 years of age, respectively. Comparing young ( < 40 years) against elderly (≥80 years), younger patients were more likely to be male (71 vs. 48%) and have idiopathic cardiomyopathy (63 vs. 7%). Younger patients reported better New York Heart Association functional class despite more severe left ventricular dysfunction (median ejection fraction: 31 vs. 42%, all P < 0.0001). Comorbidities such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, and atrial fibrillation were much less common in the young. Younger patients received more disease-modifying pharmacological therapy than their older counterparts. Across the younger age groups ( < 40, 40–49, and 50–59 years), mortality rates were low: 1 year 6.7, 6.6, and 7.5%, respectively; 2 year 11.7, 11.5, 13.0%; and 3 years 16.5, 16.2, 18.2%. Furthermore, 1-, 2-, and 3-year mortality rates increased sharply beyond 60 years and were greatest in the elderly (≥80 years): 28.2, 44.5, and 57.2%, respectively. Conclusion: Younger patients with heart failure have different clinical characteristics including different aetiologies, more severe left ventricular dysfunction, and less severe symptoms. Three-year mortality rates are lower for all age groups under 60 years compared with older patients.

School/Institute

Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Document Type

Journal Article

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