Publication Date

2012

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate ecological model predictions of cross-level interactions among psychosocial and environmental correlates of physical activity in 719 community-dwelling older adults in the Baltimore, Maryland and Seattle, Washington areas during 2005–2008. Method: Walkability, access to parks and recreation facilities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) minutes per week (min/week) were measured objectively. Neighborhood aesthetics, walking facilities, social support, self-efficacy, barriers and transportation and leisure walking min/week were self-reported. Results: Walkability interacted with social support in explaining total MVPA (B = 13.71) and with social support (B = 7.90), self-efficacy (B = 7.66) and barriers (B = − 8.26) in explaining walking for transportation. Aesthetics interacted with barriers in explaining total MVPA (B = − 12.20) and walking facilities interacted with self-efficacy in explaining walking for leisure (B = − 10.88; Ps < .05). Summarizing across the interactions, living in a supportive environment (vs. unsupportive) was related to 30–59 more min/week of physical activity for participants with more positive psychosocial attributes, but only 0–28 more min/week for participants with less positive psychosocial attributes. Conclusion: Results supported synergistic interactions between built environment and psychosocial factors in explaining physical activity among older adults. Findings suggest multilevel interventions may be most effective in increasing physical activity.

School/Institute

Institute for Health and Ageing

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

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