Publication Date

2016

Abstract

Summary: We investigated whether repeat BMD measurements in clinical populations are useful for fracture risk assessment. We report that repeat BMD measurements are a robust predictor of fracture in clinical populations; this is not affected by preceding BMD change or recent osteoporosis therapy. Introduction: In clinical practice, many patients selectively undergo repeat bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. We investigated whether repeat BMD measurements in clinical populations are useful for fracture risk assessment and whether this is affected by preceding change in BMD or recent osteoporosis therapy. Methods: We identified women and men aged ≥50 years who had a BMD measurement during 1990–2009 from a large clinical BMD database for Manitoba, Canada (n = 50,215). Patient subgroups aged ≥50 years at baseline with repeat BMD measures were identified. Data were linked to an administrative data repository, from which osteoporosis therapy, fracture outcomes, and covariates were extracted. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we assessed covariate-adjusted risk for major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) and hip fracture according to BMD (total hip, lumbar spine, femoral neck) at different time points. Results: Prevalence of osteoporosis therapy increased from 18 % at baseline to 55 % by the fourth measurement. Total hip BMD was predictive of MOF at each time point. In the patient subgroup with two repeat BMD measurements (n = 13,481), MOF prediction with the first and second measurements was similar: adjusted-hazard ratio (HR) per SD 1.45 (95 % CI 1.34–1.56) vs. 1.64 (95 % CI 1.48–1.81), respectively. No differences were seen when the second measurement results were stratified by preceding change in BMD or osteoporosis therapy (both p-interactions > 0.2). Similar results were seen for hip fracture prediction and when spine and femoral neck BMD were analyzed. Conclusion: Repeat BMD measurements are a robust predictor of fracture in clinical populations; this is not affected by preceding BMD change or recent osteoporosis therapy.

School/Institute

Institute for Health and Ageing

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

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