Publication Date

2013

Abstract

Aim: This paper reports on the development, implementation and evaluation of the Alcohol Intervention Training Program (AITP) designed to enhance nurses’ capacity to work with farming men and women who misuse alcohol. Background: In rural and regional areas where alcohol-related behaviours and problems are relatively elevated, nurses may be the key health professionals dealing with individuals who misuse alcohol. However, they are often ill-equipped to do this, have low confidence in their ability to do so, and perceive numerous barriers. Training is required for these nurses. Methods: We developed the AITP to enhance nurses’ capacity to work with people with alcohol-related problems. The data were collected during 2010. An intervention group of 15 rural nurses completed the AITP. Nurses’ perceived barriers, attitudes, and perceived performance in working with clients with alcohol problems, and the frequency of engaging with this client group were evaluated. Scores on these measures were compared to those of a control group of 17 nurses’ pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up. Results: Participation in the AITP resulted in initial improvements in attitudes to working with alcohol problems, but no change in perceived barriers to doing so. The level of engagement with clients having alcohol-related problems increased, as did perceptions of work performance. Conclusion: The AITP enhances the ability of rural nurses to address the alcohol and associated health issues of clients in rural and regional areas. However, the program needs refinement and further evaluation.

School/Institute

Institute for Health and Ageing

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

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