Publication Date

2014

Abstract

Globalization and cosmopolitanism are treated differently in various literatures. The relations of each to the political state and migration, in terms of mobilities and enclavement, are also variably treated in different sources. The article shows that these concerns are not confined to early 21st-century developments but drew attention in accounts of globalization in 17th- and 18th-century social economies.

School/Institute

Institute for Religion, Politics, and Society

Document Type

Journal Article

Access Rights

ERA Access

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